Somali Style in the Groot Karoo

Somali Style in the Groot Karoo

April 7, 2015

Quivertree Publications

Blog post written by Tudor Caradoc-Davies. 11 official languages, multiple ethic groups, religions and tribes and a populace with ancestry that stretches all over the planet, South Africa’s spread of people is among the most diverse anywhere in the world. … Continued

Blog post written by Tudor Caradoc-Davies.

11 official languages, multiple ethic groups, religions and tribes and a populace with ancestry that stretches all over the planet, South Africa’s spread of people is among the most diverse anywhere in the world.

And it’s still changing. As one of the more stable countries on the continent, a steady stream of refugees make their way to South Africa seeking their fortune and sometimes just a little certainty. Horiya Mohamed is one such example. A Somali who fled the war in her home country and made her way south through Kenya and Tanzania to get to South Africa, Horiya and her husband eventually settled in Beaufort West as traders. Safer than the bigger centres of South Africa where Somalis and other foreigners often experience xenophobia, it was here that Sydda Essop met Horiya and featured her in her book Karoo Kitchen, a multi-layered exploration of heritage recipes and true stories from the heartland of South Africa.

Despite being so far from Somalia and many of the unique ingredients she grew up using, Horiya still cooks the food of her home country.

“I still cook traditionally but miss all the fresh goat’s milk on a daily basis. We have our traditional pancakes, anjera and shaah, which is Somali tea in the mornings, as well as our rice and meat dishes. I hail from a tight-knit community in Somalia and miss the festivities, celebrations and the kinship amongst neighbours. But, even though I find it hard to speak Afrikaans, I get along well with my customers.”

One of the Horiya’s favourite rice and meat dishes is Somalian Lamb’s Liver, an interesting take on one perhaps the Karoo’s most celebrated ingredient.

somali

Somalian Lamb’s Liver

¼ cup sunflower oil or 5 tbsp ghee (clarified butter) 1 onion, chopped • 1 tomato, chopped • half a green pepper • 1 green or red chilli, or ½ tsp chilli powder • juice of 1 lemon • 1½ tsp ground coriander • 3 tbsp fresh coriander or italian parsley leaves • salt and black pepper to taste 500g lamb’s liver, cut into small pieces.

Heat the oil or ghee in a pan. Fry the onion until soft and light brown, add the tomato and simmer for 5 minutes over moderate heat. Add the green pepper, chilli, lemon juice, ground and fresh coriander (or parsley) and salt and pepper to taste. Stir in the liver and cook until tender and done. Serve with Somalian rice. Tip: Goat, cow or sheep liver can also be used.

Somalian Rice

¼ cup olive or sunflower oil • 1 stick of cinnamon • ½ tsp ground cumin 2 cloves of garlic (optional) • 2 whole cloves • 3 cardamom pods 1 chicken stock cube or 2 tsp chicken stock powder (optional) ¼ tsp ground nutmeg • ¼ tsp saffron • 1 small onion, thinly sliced or chopped 2 cups basmati rice, rinsed until the water is clear • 1¼ litres chicken stock or water • ¼ cup frozen peas (optional) • for the garnish (optional): 2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter) • 1 small onion, chopped

Heat the oil in a saucepan and add the cinnamon, cumin, garlic, cloves, cardamom, chicken stock, nutmeg, saffron and onion. Fry until the onion is translucent. Add the rice and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Add the chicken stock or water and the peas and steam-boil until the water has been reduced. For the garnish, fry the onion for about 2 minutes in the clarified butter and sprinkle over the rice.

karoo-kitchen-coverKaroo Kitchen is available from all good bookstores. Discover the traditional recipes, veld remedies and diverse culinary tales in Karoo Kitchen, a fascinating visit to the historic heart of South Africa.

 

© 2017 | Quivertree Publications | All Rights Reserved